How to Request Services Graphic Design Service the Right Way!

We don’t know how much your project will cost –
at least not initially

Imagine calling a mechanic and saying:
“hey, I need you to fix my car. How much will it cost?”

At that moment, he has no idea of the make and model of your car or the symptoms that may be plaguing your vehicle. He has not even had an opportunity to look under the hood. Yet you want to know how much it will cost to fix-it without providing any details. Well asking how much creative services may cost is much the same. We require more info!

Sending an obscure inquiry like this does not work:

“hey, I need a new website. How much will it cost?”
or
“I need a logo for my biz”
or
“I need a flier designed for my business”

In all of the above cases (which are all too often the case) there’s no defining info about what you do or your business. No supporting details whatsoever. FYI: fliers can be created in countless sizes – but there’s not even that provided. How vague is that?

Designers, like mechanics, may have baseline pricing for certain services. However, each project is different and requires an individual assessment prior to providing any pricing details or an estimate. Again the mechanic reference: he may have set prices for say brakes – but there may be other underlying issues with your car that need to be addressed. So he cannot give you a estimate till he knows what those may be. Like a doctor, he needs to “diagnose” before he can “prescribe”.

Requesting design services:

what to include in your initial inquiry:

So let’s get down to how you should request services – and professionalism matters!
There is a human on the other end of your inquiry, so please do introduce yourself.

Designers may each have their own set of initial questions – but most will require that you clearly define your project (no ambiguity.) At a minimum, include the following info:

  • Name of your business or organization
  • Where you are located (City, State)
  • What you do/your industry
  • Type of project you’re considering: brochure, banner ad, flier etc.
  • Your url/website address (if you have a website)

Inquiry Example – BAD:
“I need a new logo for my business and need it done ASAP”
(This does not tell the designer squat! It has little or no info to go on. Nor does it consider whether or not the designer is even available)

Inquiry Example – GOOD:
“Greetings,
I have a new business I’m about to embark on called ACME Widget Services. We are located in Golden, CO and create very custom purple widgets for the appliance industry. We are currently in need of a logo that properly defines our business so that our customers may identify with our brand.

After reviewing the information on your website and some examples from your online portfolio we’d like to see if you may be available to assist us with our new identity. Here is the url to our business: www.acmewidgetservices.com.

How do you generally proceed with new projects?

Respectfully,
Thomas”

(Notice the difference? This person gave a good overview of their project/business, and reflected professionalism. Most designers would be motivated to respond and likely want to work with them. First impressions are huge!